The Coronini Mansion

The Coronini mansion after the last renovation - Tolmin museum

The Mansion was built in the second half of the 17th century to replace the deteriorating and inaccessible fort that stood on the steep hill named Kozlov Rob in the middle of the valley since the 12th century.

The governor Peter Anton Coronini commissioned it and his family has owned it for almost 200 years. In 1848, Luigi Silverij Kremer bought the large estate and soon sold it off to farmers, piece by piece. The last private owners Janez Permerstein and Filippo Persoglia bought the humble remains of the land and the Mansion in 1871.

At its grandest the building comprised the Mansion tract, four corner towers, two lower buildings for subsidiary functions and the Anton Padovanski Chapel. A lawn stretched across the frontal court, separated from the main road by a stone wall, across which the path lead to the main doors. The Mansion Park, planted with diverse plants and crisscrossed with footpaths, was spread out on the southwestern side of the palace and down to the edge of the river terrace; a gazebo decorated the park's boundary. The only surviving tree of that park is an enormous tulip poplar in the middle of the parking space Na brajdi.

The building was refurbished several times since its beginnings. Major adaptations were carried out after WWI since it suffered severe damage during the war. With the last renovation works, which were initiated in 1992, the house was completely renewed from basement to attic.

Opening time
Tolmin museum, permanent exhibition

Tuesday - Friday: 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Saturday, Sunday,
Holiday: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday closed
closed also Jan 1, Nov 1, Dec 25
Entrance fee
Tolmin museum, permanent exhibition

individuals
adults: 4 €
children, students, seniors: 3 €
preschool children: free
families with chidren up to 15 years: 7,00 €
groups
adults, seniors: 3 €
children, students: 2 €

Tolmin museum, temporary exhibition

adults: 2 €
children, students, seniors: 1 €
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